Public policy and government affairs

Mobile radio access networks: What policy makers need to know

Public policy and government affairs for a connected future

Ericsson engages and collaborates with governments, regulators, legislators, businesses and industry associations to achieve positive and sustainable long term conditions for the ICT sector.

Around the world, government efforts to regulate the ICT sector are broadening, as issues related to network regulation, spectrum allocations, data flows, cybersecurity, privacy and trade continue to drive policy in markets around the world. With our presence in more than 180 countries, Ericsson’s Government & Industry Relations team works with our stakeholders to craft regulatory and public solutions that drive innovation, economic growth and societal inclusion.

Spectrum policymakers around the world face an important decision in the coming years, as they decide on the optimal approach for managing spectrum in the 6 GHz frequency band. In order to assist their decision, GSMA Intelligence has performed a socio-economic benefit analysis. The report finds that:

  • generally, allocating the full 6 GHz band for licensed mobile will drive the greatest economic benefit;
  • allocating the full band for unlicensed will not be the most beneficial allocation in any of the considered analyses and;
  • allocating the lower 6 GHz band for unlicensed and the upper 6 GHz for licensed could drive the greatest economic benefit only under certain conditions (e.g. large fibre-, cable broadband adoption and very high fixed broadband speeds to all fibre- cable users)”.

Erik Ekudden, CTO of Ericsson, says “we urge nations to carefully assess the allocation of the 6 GHz band as this represents a key opportunity for the 5G and its evolution. The ecosystem in this band is growing following the developments towards a possible IMT identification at World Radio Conference -23 and the decision by 3GPP to define a licensed 6 GHz band”.

The 6 GHz band (5925-7125 MHz) provides a unique opportunity to address mid-band spectrum needs. Global mobile organization GSMA recommends governments and regulators “plan to make 2 GHz of mid-band spectrum available in the 2025-2030 time frame. This is the average value needed to guarantee the IMT- 2020 requirements for 5G”,

On March 9th Glenn was appointed to chair ITU-T SG15 that defines global standards for technologies and architectures of optical transport networks enabling long-haul global information exchange.

“We are proud that Ericsson remains a trusted partner at ITU WTSA,” says Erik Ekudden, CTO Ericsson.  “The diligent effort Bruce Gracie has shown chairing the Assembly will continue with Glenn Parsons managing the standardization professionals and growing the relevance of SG15 over the next study period.”

The photo shows: Ericsson’s delegation to the World Telecommunication Standardization Assembly (WTSA-20) in Geneva. From left to right: Per Fröjdh - new Vice Chairman of ITU-T SG16 (Multimedia), Glenn Parsons - new Chairman of ITU-T SG15 (Transport, Access and Home) and Bruce Gracie - Chairman of WTSA-20.

We were also joined online by Scott Mansfield who was reappointed as Vice Chairman of SG13 (Future Networks & Cloud).

Policy and technology trends

Listen to Ericsson executives and experts  discuss the latest trends in technology and telecom policy. 5G  as an  innovation platform has a transformative impact on our societies  and supports the trends of digitalization and transition to  more sustainable societies.

Ericsson President and CEO, Börje Ekholm  discusses telecom policy and the transformative impact 5G will have on our societies. (9 min)

Ericsson Group CTO, Erik Ekudden, shares his perspectives on key technology trends in 5G. (20 min)

Ericsson Head of Center of Excellence Industry 4.0, Joe Wilke, shares the experiences from a 5G deployment in a commercial car factory in Germany (20 min)

Marie Hogan, Ericsson introduces the new capabilities with 5G Standalone, such as network slicing, low latency and much more. (21 min)

Andreas Hessler, Ericsson talks about the energy efficiency  improvements made in 5G Radio Access Networks. (15 min)

Gösta Lemne, Ericsson discusses the different option available when industries are deploying 5G services in their operations. (14 min)

With the deployment of 5G and the demand for reliable, secure and robust connectivity, mobile network operators need to address the intensifying complexity of their networks that is driven by the increasing volume of devices, multiple new technologies, and more diverse service requirements.

The shift from the traditional network resource management model – where technology-related capacity, performance and availability are key – to successfully operating high-performance service-driven networks in a secure manner means that the operations and optimization of 5G networks must transform from being technology to end-user service centric.

Timely licensing of harmonized spectrum suitable for 4G and 5G is a requirement to achieve early mass market services and applications.

Spectrum regulation should aim for attaining harmonized and unrestrictive regulatory conditions for 5G and 6G systems.

A wave of 5G auctions and renewals of existing licenses are expected over the next five years.

Network regulation should support long term stable rules that stimulate investments and usage, foster infrastructure competition, and uphold the principle of technology neutrality.

Policy makers should support an open and non-discriminatory internet and a framework for net neutrality that provides consumers with access to the content, applications, and services they want, while promoting continued investment, experimentation, differentiation, and innovation.

Cyber-attacks target all kinds of devices, services, and networks, and come in a variety of forms, including information theft, fraud, identity theft, denial of service and malware. Security status of mobile networks is a key consideration to protect end-users.

Data protection regulation should define neither the technology nor the means used for the collection and processing of the personal data.

Data should be able to flow by default. Any limitation to cross border data flows should be limited to clearly defined exceptions in line with WTO principles such as GATS Article 14.

ICT industry has been and is a vocal advocate for global open trade and the removal of tariff and non-tariff barriers, benefitting competition, economic growth and access to technology that benefits society.

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Please contact your local Ericsson office to find out more about our thinking on these topics.

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